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Cardiac Tumor Treatment

Tumour is essentially an outgrowth on any tissue or organ surface. When this tissue outgrowth occurs on the surface of the cardiac tissues.

Types of cardiac tumours

Like all other tumours, cardiac tumours also have two general types. The names of those types of tumours are;

  • Benign tumour: These types of tumours are non-cancerous in origin. They can be of any size depending upon the time of their first occurrence. They do not spread to localized or distant organs. 
  • Malignant tumour: These types of tumours are cancerous and therefore have the property of metastasizing, which is, essentially, spreading to other sites. They are the hardest to treat and the success rate of complete remission and non-occurrence for a second time cannot be termed as satisfactory.

According to the location of their origin, tumours can be divided into two divisions. They are known as;

  • Primary tumour: The tumours that originate in the cardiac site and remains there, is known as the primary tumour. The most common type of benign cardiac tumour is myxoma. They are more prevalent in women than in men. Other non-cancerous primary tumour can be stated as papillary fibroelastosis, fibromas, rhabdomyomas, hemangiomas, teratomas, lipomas, paragangliomas and pericardial cysts. 
  • Secondary tumour: The tumour which originates elsewhere and spread to the cardiac tissues is known as a secondary tumour. Most often, their site of origin can be seen to be the lungs, stomach, breast, kidney, colon, and liver. They are usually related to lymphoma, leukaemia or melanoma origins.

Most cardiac tumours are benign. However, sometimes little pieces of them can fall into the bloodstream, get carried away and cause an obstruction in the way of blood supply to the major organs. This condition is called an embolism.

Causes

The cause of a tumour in the heart may be varied and usually is found out to be an external factor or reason that generates this type of outgrowth. Some of the known reasons can be stated as;

Genetic predisposition: 

Usually, a person inflicted with a cardiac tumour has been seen to have some members in the previous generation with the same disease. Nearly 10% of cardiac tumours are passed down in generation bloodlines.

Secondary effects:

The tumours may occur due to an effect of another disease, namely, NAME Syndrome, Carney Syndrome, and LAMB Syndrome which causes this inflammation in the cardiac tissues.

Cell overgrowth

Most often, cardiac tumours are found to generate simply by the uncontrolled division of cells, or metastasizing from another location of the cardiac valves and muscles.

Causes

The cause of a tumour in the heart may be varied and usually is found out to be an external factor or reason that generates this type of outgrowth. Some of the known reasons can be stated as;

Genetic predisposition: 

Usually, a person inflicted with a cardiac tumour has been seen to have some members in the previous generation with the same disease. Nearly 10% of cardiac tumours are passed down in generation bloodlines.

Secondary effects:

The tumours may occur due to an effect of another disease, namely, NAME Syndrome, Carney Syndrome, and LAMB Syndrome which causes this inflammation in the cardiac tissues.

Cell overgrowth

Most often, cardiac tumours are found to generate simply by the uncontrolled division of cells, or metastasizing from another location of the cardiac valves and muscles.

Tobacco

Tobacco contains nicotine, which is a known agent of cancer-causing chemicals. Smoking, inhalation, and chewing of tobacco products may cause tumour in the respective organs, which may spread to the cardiac tissues. 

Symptoms

The symptoms of cardiac tumours are not very specific. Sometimes, there may not be any symptoms at all. At times, symptoms of cardiac tumours may surface suddenly and may resemble other heart diseases. Their intensity may range from mild to severe. The general indicators of cardiac tumours may resemble that of endocarditis and can be noticed as;

  • Difficulty in breathing when lying in a flat position or when taking a rest.
  • Sudden light-headedness, fainting, or unsteadiness.
  • Very fast heart rate or Palpitations. 
  • Chest pain
  • Fever or cough.
  • Unintentional weight loss.
  • Pain in joints.